Leftovers, performed by Company 605 Co-Artistic Director Josh Martin, explores the body’s creation of ideas and retrieval of memory. Martin’s quick and precise time signature facilitates a pixilated, somewhat stop-motion imagery like I’ve never seen before. As he advances across the stage, sequences are chopped into pieces, so that the spaces in between constantly interrupt his line of vision. His limbs struggle to lift his body from the ground, while his mind seems to disconnect from his tissue and bone. Martin explores how the mind and the body become two separate entities, each competing for the same resource: memory.

The mind has its own recollection of memory, as does the body. This internal conflict causes a lag in the movement’s ability to reach its potential. Then a sequence appears in which movement ideas are franticly interrupted by more ideas, which attests to an underlying emotion of anxiousness. Through repetition of movement, Martin explores how different body parts retrieve the same memory. A constant internal shift of perspective creates impulses that pull and shove his body. His muscle and bone compete for attention, while he himself is silent, as if he is a bystander of his own body, witnessing this all of his joints, limbs, and digits give a frantic speech.

An incredible investigation of the mind and body’s response to memory, Leftovers, left me in a coherent daze. 

 
Zoe Abrigo, from Honolulu, Hawaii, is a first-year student at the University of Calgary studying in the BFA dance program. She trains in ballet and contemporary, and has a strong interest in both performance and choreography. 

Zoe Abrigo, from Honolulu, Hawaii, is a first-year student at the University of Calgary studying in the BFA dance program. She trains in ballet and contemporary, and has a strong interest in both performance and choreography.