Thus Spoke | SCPA Review

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Thus Spoke | SCPA Review

Thus Spoke captivated the audience with it’s imprudent, exciting and humorous content. The first scene was remarkable, starting off with a male performer speaking through a mic that was the only prop used in the piece. The first political statement of the piece pertained to “privilege”. The dancer explored what is means to be privileged. Following that statement, the performer introduced the theme of “contingency” as he lay on the floor maneuvering himself around the mic stand. The performance switched in an instance as one of the male performers started a chant about salary. Loud rock and roll music began playing and the performers began running and yelling around the stage. In this moment the audience was pleasantly surprised and instantly became more engaged in the performance.

This piece makes you question, What is dance? What can the “body/ies” do? Simply put, dance is the movement quality of everyday actions in a different form. The dancers used the mic to clearly demonstrate their impulses and the music around them. They travelled through a great amount of space, utilizing the entire stage exploring different abstract shapes and levels with their bodies. It was clear that the dancers focused on their breathing, as their bound movements were sustained and well executed. Having speech as the main element of the performance made for a very pleasurable experience. The infusion of speech and movement working together was mesmerizing. As the piece came to an end a female performer spoke about justice and how each and everyone one of us have the power to create a just world.

Are you dance curious? Satisfy your curiosity with this outrageous performance!    

Christina Scott-Casey is a dance major at The University Of Calgary. She has fifteen years of dance performing experience.

Christina Scott-Casey is a dance major at The University Of Calgary. She has fifteen years of dance performing experience.

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Thus Spoke | SCPA Review

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Thus Spoke | SCPA Review

Thus Spoke brought together a series of controversial topics and presented them through raw and unfiltered explanations and movement. Each dancer willingly threw themselves into the monologues they were presenting and delivered their message in ways that included comic relief. The topic of acceptance of all people in society, as well as the importance of privilege were some of the big topics explored throughout the piece.

The passion of the dancers helped to create a raw, uncensored picture of the way people think about certain topics. The actual movement itself was quite simple in that it was a series of hip isolations, subtle reaches, wild abandonment, all movements that complimented the message being shared. Though powerful at times, I must say some of the content was uncomfortable to witness as viewer. Dance takes many forms and allows for much experiment and abstractness as an art. However, in this particular piece the sexual references used, took away from the power of the messages and created a level of discomfort.

As a whole, it was evident that the dancers were immersed in a form of urban art, with the intention of involving the audience in a journey through speech and movement designed to create an impact, provoking thought in the audience members. A goal that was efficiently achieved.

Madeline Russo is currently enrolled in the dance program at the University of Calgary as a dance major in a Bachelor of Arts degree. She has been dancing for 15 years. She has trained in all styles, specializing in ballet for 13 years. She has worked with Alberta Ballet and was accepted into their professional division program at age 13. Recently however, Madeline switched her major study of dance to hip hop, and she now dances with a company called “Illfx” in one of their top pre-professional crews.    

Madeline Russo is currently enrolled in the dance program at the University of Calgary as a dance major in a Bachelor of Arts degree. She has been dancing for 15 years. She has trained in all styles, specializing in ballet for 13 years. She has worked with Alberta Ballet and was accepted into their professional division program at age 13. Recently however, Madeline switched her major study of dance to hip hop, and she now dances with a company called “Illfx” in one of their top pre-professional crews.

 

 

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Double Bill Review by Rita Bozi

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Double Bill Review by Rita Bozi

Yes & Sara Does a Solo

By Rita Bozi, Writer, Performer, Somatic Trauma-informed Therapist

This double bill, comprised of two solos, one by Sara Porter (Toronto) and the other by Linnea Swan (Calgary) is advertised as funny and irreverent dance theatre. The evening does more than live up to its description. Video, text, narrative, comedy, theatre, improv, singing, ukulele-playing, one foot tap dancing, crude karaoke and skilled, embodied movement are just a few of the talents on display by two of Canada’s best dance artists.

While both thirty-minute solos are self referential, risk-taking and boundary pushing, each artist conveys her own unique take on creating, experiencing and living dance – not just from the performer’s perspective but from the audience’s as well. Angst driven Swan grotesquely delivers the lines, “Do you often find yourself saying, oh, well maybe I just didn’t get it…Are you secretly terrified that you will find yourself trapped in a theatre watching a show when half the time they aren’t doing anything? And when they are doing something, God knows why they are doing it?” No danger of that here.

Swan’s piece is built around the 1965 No Manifesto by dancer/choreographer Yvonne Rainer revolutionizing dance and reducing it to its essential elements. According to Swan’s fabulously satirical take on this revolution, this manifesto sucked the life, blood and soul out of dance for the next 50 years. Until of course Swan came along and urged us all to say, “YES!” to spectacle, “YES!” to virtuosity, “YES!” to transformation, “YES!” to magic and make-believe.

Swan is a fierce and deeply skilled performer with an instantly likeable personality whether she is audaciously exposing truths most other people wouldn’t say out loud or flashing her smoker’s teeth on a video wearing a faux fur Russian hat. She is a woman who’s had enough and is not afraid to say it!

Yes contains so many layers that I can’t even begin to comb the surface in a short review. Suffice it to say, you are missing the opportunity to be transformed if you don’t see this show. Outspoken? Yes! A little nuts? Yes! I say a big yes to Yes.

Porter’s solo demonstrates this creator’s multiple talents: author, mother, story teller, singer, musician, dancer and visual manipulator. She is a stunning dancer at heart even though she grapples with the dancer she once was, whether she is still a dancer, whether she will be one in the future whether she ever was one. Twice she took a long break. She has a talent for word play and a play on words. These deftly delivered lines are only a few of the clever observations amongst many others: “My improv teacher gave me two important pieces of advice. One, begin before you are ready. Two, don’t begin before you are ready. I follow both religiously.” Playful and touching vignettes weave together intelligently and poetically in this satisfying gift to the audience. My favourite image is of Porter in a red ball gown, playing a red ukulele while wearing one red tap shoe; she taps out a rhythm with one foot and sings the word, “Crazy.”

I might go as far as to say that these are two dance theatre geniuses who deserve to be seen by many more people than show up for this kind of work. They too seem to sense why the masses bail on modern dance, and yet their bold and brash insights are the very stuff of rare and nuanced performance that could actually raise our cultural IQ. If only we all took the risks that these two brilliant, self-exposing women take. There is not one art form that I can think of that takes such expansive gambles as dance theatre, nor artists that stretch themselves in this way. Bravo to Sara Porter and Linnea Swan, I bow to their feet.

Rita Bozi is a writer, performer, creator, somatic trauma-informed therapist and retired dancer. She is co-artistic director (with Ken Cameron) of Productive Obsession a multi-disciplinary performance company. Her travel stories have been heard on Calgary CBC Radio’s The Homestretch. Her fiction has been published in The New Quarterly, Unlikely 2.0 and Writing raw.com. She was awarded 3rd prize in THIS Magazine’sGreat Canadian Literary Hunt. She has danced with Lola Dance, Karen Jamieson, Debra Dunn, Judith Marcuse, The National Ballet and Royal Winnipeg Ballet. She was lead dancer with Jumpstart Performance for 5 years. Rita has performed with One Yellow Rabbit and is co-writer of one of the longest running Fringe shows, 52 Pick Up for which she won the Chapter’s best text award. She has written her first novel When I Was Better, is working on a collaborative art installation in Estonia called One Month in Canada and premiers her one woman show My Fair Lady- The Punk Version at Theatre Grand in February 2018. She has a private practice in Calgary. 

Rita Bozi is a writer, performer, creator, somatic trauma-informed therapist and retired dancer. She is co-artistic director (with Ken Cameron) of Productive Obsession a multi-disciplinary performance company. Her travel stories have been heard on Calgary CBC Radio’s The Homestretch. Her fiction has been published in The New Quarterly, Unlikely 2.0 and Writing raw.com. She was awarded 3rd prize in THIS Magazine’sGreat Canadian Literary Hunt. She has danced with Lola Dance, Karen Jamieson, Debra Dunn, Judith Marcuse, The National Ballet and Royal Winnipeg Ballet. She was lead dancer with Jumpstart Performance for 5 years. Rita has performed with One Yellow Rabbit and is co-writer of one of the longest running Fringe shows, 52 Pick Up for which she won the Chapter’s best text award. She has written her first novel When I Was Better, is working on a collaborative art installation in Estonia called One Month in Canada and premiers her one woman show My Fair Lady- The Punk Version at Theatre Grand in February 2018. She has a private practice in Calgary. 

 

 

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Prairie Dance Circuit Review by Jenna Turk

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Prairie Dance Circuit Review by Jenna Turk

Curious. By Jenna Turk

BE MOVED. BE CURIOUS. BE FLUID. For me, the second part of this year’s Fluid Movement Arts Festival motto was the most accurate in my experience of the Prairie Dance Circuit.

With four different pieces choreographed by artists from Calgary, Edmonton, and Regina for local performers they find particularly inspiring, the programme was diverse and intriguing. Plus, full disclosure as myself a theatremaker, I especially enjoyed the theatricality of the pieces and the sense of play throughout the night.

The first performance, Still. Moving. Land. Acknowledgement., a duet by Fluid Fest Director Nicole Mion created and performed with Troy Emery Twigg set the stage for the evening –or rather unset it. Most of Prairie Dance Circuit is presented on a bare stage with the curtains pulled back to reveal the wings and any and all happenings backstage. This full disclosure space certainly fit the piece, as it focussed on the sharing of personal histories and the airing of acknowledgements. Grounded by two small rocks at center stage, the pair interchanges dance and stories about their grandmothers. A modest piece that invited the night’s cozy audience to get even closer.

Brian Webb’s solo, Portrait, for Tony Olivares journeys through time inspired by three personal stories told by Olivares, jumping from their first meeting in a class at Grant MacEwan in 1991 to the ravaging of his birthplace by civil war to his first discovery of dance. Olivares is a beautiful and charismatic performer, and Webb’s piece truly celebrates the depth of his talents, showcasing his humour and heart. The work is partly bookended by two recordings of the same song, “The First Time Ever I Saw Your Face,” one sung by George Michael and one by Johnny Cash. An effective choice reflecting the inner histories we all bear from birth to death and the weight we carry with us.

THIS created by Robin Poitras for Krista Solheim, while an offshoot of a previously built group piece, End of Winter, it was so singularly engaging. Solheim presents as a kind of goat creature in furry pants and knobbed hair ears. This, in itself, is intriguing, but the specificity and steady rhythm of the piece are what pulled the audience in. A natural history lesson delivered through dance. Quirky and impactful, I will remember THIS.

The Prairie Circuit concluded with a second piece by Nicole Mion, SALT, featuring Linnea Swan. A dance about control. Swan nimbly navigates a world of boxes she has self-created with lines of salt on the stage floor, until she can no longer abide them. An exploration of tension and release, this piece seems like a direct reflection of the minds of many women I know –myself included. We long for a release, but know it will be tough as all hell to clean up the mess afterwards.

For an evening of exploration, the Prairie Circuit delivers a full festival experience in a single night. Curious? Be there.

  A writer, actor, and collaborator, Jenna Turk moved to Calgary a year ago to take on the position of Artistic Associate at Theatre Calgary after almost a decade working in Toronto’s indie theatre scene. She holds a BFA in Acting from the University of Windsor and an MFA in Creative Writing from the University of Guelph. Check out her latest show, The Starving Time, as part of NEXT STAGE at Theatre Junction this spring. She mostly dances solo in her bedroom.

 

A writer, actor, and collaborator, Jenna Turk moved to Calgary a year ago to take on the position of Artistic Associate at Theatre Calgary after almost a decade working in Toronto’s indie theatre scene. She holds a BFA in Acting from the University of Windsor and an MFA in Creative Writing from the University of Guelph. Check out her latest show, The Starving Time, as part of NEXT STAGE at Theatre Junction this spring. She mostly dances solo in her bedroom.

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Double Bill: Sara does a Solo & YES | SCPA Review

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Double Bill: Sara does a Solo & YES | SCPA Review

Sara does a Solo

Sara Porter enters the stage wearing a red and white checkered shirt, black pants, and red boots. She begins by sharing that she was first introduced to dance at the age of nine. Due to the earnest quality of movements, she found no appeal in it until her late teenage years. She goes on to say that she is the author of Peter in Process: Peter Boneham’s Sixty Years in Dance, and that she is the mother of three kids. After this introduction, the line between fact and fiction is blurred. Her monologue begins with a series of phrases that explore her relationship to dance: “I had been a dancer” … “Should have been a dancer” … “But having been a dancer”… “I am a dancer.” These final words trigger a series of free flow movements that release the inside out, unrestricted, to explore the range of the large kinesphere. 

Early in the piece, Porter states that she will avoid talking and dancing at the same time as she questions how the words and movements go together. Yet, this work is all about the concurrence of text and movement. Porter shares a realization with the audience – it is helpful to read yourself as “fact” and “fiction”. Emphasizing the importance of this idea, she takes off and places her red boots one by one, to the sound of those two words. Undressing her attire as a means of letting go of the “fact”, she undergoes a transformation on stage as she enters her first fictional character – a girl in a red, floor length gown. She moves through space in an indirect way, seeing more options of movements as her reliance on improvisation becomes greater. Porter states that the key to improvisation is “1. Start before you are ready and 2. Don’t start before you are ready.” Her movements exhibiting bound flow, stronger weight effort, and sudden timing as she explores the movement possibilities with the vast array of props available at her fingertips. A mix of dance, storytelling, and visual design, this piece is a reminder of the value of being connected to your inner creative state.

YES

Linnea Swan’s work is centered around the 1965 No Manifesto written by Yvonne Rainer. Swan begin her performance with ‘Trio A’: an influential work that aims to strip away the unwanted drama and present the body as the core dance object. She boldly brings attention to the audience alienating tendencies exhibited by dancers, and her frustrations with “hearing people say yes to no.” Swan takes the audience on a wild journey as she addresses each of the phrases of the Manifesto. After each witty enactment of the phrases, the accompanying digital narrative voice says NO! The words “no to moving”, paralyze the dancer in her tracks. Her feet parallel, right arm bent in front of her body, as if an invisible force has grabbed her wrist. Her hand begins to tremble, the sensation spreads to the rest of her body, and Swan is encompassed by hysteria of ‘No’. It is here that she exemplifies her own manifesto – the Yes Manifesto. “Yes to virtuosity, Yes to thoughtfulness, Yes to visceral!” This work aims to empower the Yes, and discover the meaning it has for each soul. It is a reminder that power lies within.


Stephanie Jurkova is pursuing a Bachelor of Fine Arts in Dance at the University of Calgary. She is a two-time Western Canadian Latin Champion and Canadian Latin Championship Finalist.

 

 

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Prairie Dance Circuit | SCPA Review

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Prairie Dance Circuit | SCPA Review

There were four sections of the performance “Prairie Dance Circuit” and each were very different although they were based on the same premise of inspiration. The first piece, titled “Still. Moving. Land. Acknowledgement” was greatly influenced by Indigenous beliefs and traditions, with the only prop being two rocks from the river. It was created by Nicole Mion and Troy Emery Twigg. Speech was essential to this piece, creating a story as well as a soundtrack. The connection between the two dancers brought warmth throughout the theatre, inviting the audience to be part of their activity.

The second piece was the opposite, being more of an entertaining performance to the audience rather than sharing the experience. Halfway through his dance, a man stood up in the crowd and shouted for the music to stop. I personally have never experienced this in a performance before and it startled me. The man asked how much of the piece was choreography and how much was improvisation, to which the dancer answered, “it’s about 50/50”. The idea that a dance could be equally planned out as improvised was perplexing to me. The conflict between knowing and not knowing could be seen throughout the piece conveyed through the dancer.

The third piece varied greatly from the first two as the dancer emulated an animal rather than dancing as a human. It was very accent oriented. It seemed as if the music was playing to whatever movement the dancer performed, rather than the dancer moving to the music and letting the music lead. There was a lot of white in this piece, including the costuming and props. This captured the audience’s attention immediately. The dancer slowly entangled herself in the paper and eventually was engulfed in it. Her individuality is compromised as she tries to survive in the blinding white land.

The last piece was my personal favourite. The use of white sand stood out to me as a meaningful metaphor. The dancer was frustrated and tired when she was avoiding stepping on the lines, but as soon as she realized that crossing the lines was not necessarily a bad thing, she was visually and audibly happier. By not following the lines or “rules,” she created something more beautiful than the picture in the beginning. However, she realized what she had done and regretted it, and she continued to clean up the mess she made in a monotone manner. This metaphor can be applied to every day life as a person tries to become an individual and live in their own way. I connected the most with the last piece because of my past experiences, so the metaphor stuck out to me. In conclusion, Prairie Dance Circuit was abstract yet raw and real, allowing the audience to interpret and connect with the performers and their stories.

Alissa Lee is attending the University of Calgary as a dance major. She has eight years of dance performance and two years of dance teaching experience.

Alissa Lee is attending the University of Calgary as a dance major. She has eight years of dance performance and two years of dance teaching experience.

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Meet the Fluid Fest Outreach Program Participants!

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Meet the Fluid Fest Outreach Program Participants!

We are thrilled to announce the nine dance curious students who will be participating in the 2017 Fluid Festival Outreach Program.

Each student will receive complimentary tickets to Fluid Fest shows, attend artist talks and other unique opportunities during the festival.

2017 OUTREACH PROGRAM PARTICIPANTS


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Zoe Abrigo

Zoe Abrigo, from Honolulu, Hawaii, is in her second year at the University of Calgary, earning a BA in dance with a concentration in dance production. She trains in ballet and contemporary, and has a strong interest for both performance and choreography. She has performed in professional works by Wojciech Mochniej and Melissa Monteros of W&M Physical Theater, and was a dancer in Gravity Dance Company's 2017 season. 

 


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Sarah Bannister

Originally from Ontario, Sarah Bannister is a second-year MFA student in Directing at the University of Calgary. After completing an undergrad degree in Theatre Studies and Plant Science, her focus is now on incorporating science and theatre, working across disciplines to encourage people to interact with the world in new ways. Additionally, she has been involved in a variety of physical activities from a young age - including gymnastics, dance, and martial arts - and loves to learn about and explore the limits of human physicality. She's very excited to be a part of the Fluid Fest Outreach Program and can't wait to take part!


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Ashley Clark

Born and raised in Calgary, Alberta, Ashley has been dancing since the age of four. She is extensively trained in ballet, jazz, tap, pointe, lyrical, contemporary, modern, musical theatre and hip hop and has competed in all of the above styles for the past four years. She has also trained in styles such as West African, Swing, Bollywood, Broadway and Latin. Throughout her years as a dancer, Ashley has had many opportunities to dance in competitions, shows and in Disneyland through the Disney Performing Arts Program. Ashley is currently continuing her training through Diversity Dance and Performing Arts, illFX Education and the Performing and Visual Arts Dance Program at Central Memorial High School. Ashley is absolutely thrilled to have been selected to be dance curious at this year's Fluid Festival!


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Melinda Coetzee

Melinda Coetzee is a 4th year student at the University of Calgary studying a double major degree which consists of a BA in Dance and a BKin in Kinesiology. She has been dancing since she was 3 years old, and has trained in Saskatchewan, British Columbia, Alberta, and also where she was born, in Krugersdorp, South Africa. In the future, she hopes to work with individuals with special needs to provide adapted and therapeutic physical activity opportunities.


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Ariane Dangelat

Ariane Dangelat is currently a third-year dance major in the Faculty of Arts, at the University of Calgary. She began dancing at the early age of 3 in Winnipeg, Manitoba then later moved to Brandon, Manitoba where she continued her training at The Brandon School of Dance. Throughout her studio career Ariane has been given many opportunities to train in Canada as well as worldwide, including Minneapolis, Spain and New York. Furthering her training in a university setting has led her to seek new information and knowledge from peers and professors. With opportunities such as Fluid Fest, she has drawn many inspirations from being an audience member as well as a performer, which has shown to be very influential in her dance training.


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Lena Dornan

 

Lena is a grade 10 student at William Aberhart High School. She has been dancing for over eleven years, and has been a member of Alberta Dance Theatre for the past five. When she’s not dancing, Lena loves spending time with her friends, babysitting, and baking. 


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Tessa Leier

Tessa Leier is currently in the Dance Program and studying Commerce at the University of Calgary. She has been dancing for the past sixteen years and is excited to be pursuing her passion. Her goal is to combine her dance knowledge with the skills and methodology of the business industry, to allow the dance industry to continue to strive and evolve.


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Erin McCafferty

Erin McCafferty is a second-year student in the BFA dance program at the University of Calgary. Dance has always been a passion of hers, and she is intrigued to continue and develop her understandings on the idiosyncrasies of dance.


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Sarah Mitchell

Sarah Mitchell is a Bachelor of Fine Art’s Dance student at the University of Calgary. In her four years at this program, she will be focused on mainly contemporary dance. Sarah will also be focused on choreographing her own pieces during these years at the University specifically in Dance @Noon and Dance @Night. Her most recent piece was choreographed after a weeklong somatic intensive with Marie France Forcier, it was during this week she created Experimental Introspection. Sarah hopes to use this knowledge from the intensive for her future choreographic works.


Be curious. Be moved. Be FLUID.

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AB Culture Days Celebrations at containR & Farewell Sunnyside!

AB Culture Days Celebrations at containR & Farewell Sunnyside!

containR by Springboard Performance is proud to celebrate Alberta Culture Days! 

Join us for a stellar lineup of programming at both Sunnyside and EV Junction locations.

Alberta Culture Days celebrations will also be containR's wrap-up weekend. After October 1st containR will be closed for the season and our Sunnyside Art Park will be moving!


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In the fall of 2013 containR moved to the Sunnyside Triangle site. Over the past 4 years we have featured a thousand artists, hosted 150 community gatherings, held 200 meetings with the city, designed cultural placemaking policy, learned more about municipal permitting and Provincial building code than we ever thought possible, and was an intrepid test site for community building, arts activism, and citizen led public space. Through all of this we were embraced by the Sunnyside community. These neighbours, known for trailblazing community activism and community experimentation, invited us to play. Thank you for 4 glorious years of connecting community through art and creative ideas.

To neighbours Kerry Treherne, Gerald Wheatley, Tamara Lee, and many others, thank you. To the HSCA, Kensington BRZ, Calgary Permaculture Guild, local businesses, and community groups, much thanks for your support. To all the neighbours and Calgarians that have been inspired to participate in our little experiment in cultural placemaking, thank you.

containR is all of you.

Join us for the Alberta Culture Days weekend for a closing weekend party to complete the season and our time in the neighbourhood.

For up-to-date info on all events see our Facebook page @containRyyc

Fluid Festival 2017 Outreach Program

Fluid Festival 2017 Outreach Program

CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS | Fluid Festival 2017 Outreach Program

Are you dance curious?

THE OPPORTUNITY

Each year the Fluid Movement Arts Festival brings artists and audiences together to stir the city with contemporary art, dance and physical performance. From grassroots to glitz - extraordinary artists from around the globe gather in Calgary for performances, workshops, artist talks and happenings to inspire and connect.

This year, we are launching an exciting new outreach initiative that supports those who want to live a creative life.  This is an unique opportunity for students (15+) and seniors (55+) to experience this year’s Fluid Festival.

Get free tickets to two Fluid Fest performances, attend post-show artist talks, and hang out with fellow arts lovers.

Whether you are dance curious or a seasoned superfan, we want you to dive head-first into the vibrant array of programming Fluid Fest has to offer!

ELIGIBLE SHOWS

All participants are offered free tickets to performance events of their choice. Participants will be expected to attend any 2 out of the 4 following shows (including accompanying Post-Show Artist Talks):

Show #1     

Telemetry

Shay Kuebler/Radical System Art

October 16, 8:00 PM at DJD Dance Centre Studio Theatre

Includes a Post-Show Artist Talk

Singing the body electric! The human body as antenna, a satellite for sound, energy and memory, translating and transmitting information into a purely kinetic vocabulary – this is the starting point for an explosive new dance creation from Vancouver’s high octane wunderkind Shay Kuebler. A convulsive synchronicity of bebop, swing, and contemporary dance—and featuring Canadian tap virtuoso Danny Nielsen—Telemetry tunes in to radio sciences and systems to generate a magnetically charged performance from its seemingly indefatigable, hugely versatile company of seven dancers. 


Show #2

Double Bill

YES | Linnea Swan

Sara does a Solo | Sara Porter

October 18, 9:00 PM at DJD Dance Centre Studio Theatre

Includes a Post-Show Artist Talk

Two outspoken female artists speak their minds through humor, story, and movement.  Funny and irreverent dance theatre.

An electrifying new dance manifesto, YES takes the audience on a wild ride through the turbulent history of Contemporary Dance. Known for her fearless approach to controversial issues, Linnea Swan unapologetically addresses Yvonne Rainer’s 1965 No Manifesto’s legacy on the current state of contemporary dance, calling out fellow artists on their audience-alienating tendencies with wit and mastery.

Sara does a Solo is being celebrated on both sides of the border, called “soulful”, “urgent” and a “tour de force” by New York presenters. After 25 years writing on the works and lives of other artists, Porter turns her pen on herself to present a collision of dance, storytelling, poetry, stand-up, singing and visual design in an inter-play of fact and fiction, memoir and fantasy, confession and caricature.


Show #3

This Duet That We’ve Already Done (so many times)

Frédérick Gravel

October 21, 8:00 PM at DJD Dance Centre Studio Theatre

Includes a Post-Show Artist Talk

This Duet is an ode to the contemporary couple, in all its complexity. Hybrid and iconoclastic, at once dramatic and wacky, this dance theatre piece touchingly captures the complex relations of attraction and repulsion that can unite two people. An intentional awkwardness and a troublingly natural game of tiny accidents that transform into multiple arguments, that reconsider our everyday banality. Brianna Lombardo’s fierce sensuality and Fréderick Gravel’s tender clumsiness create an idiosyncratic vibrant performance. Alive with humor, grace, and everyday moments of instinct, this work never ceases to surprise and destabilize.

*contains nudity and sexuality


Show #4

Triple Bill

It began with watching | kloetzel&co.

Submission to Entropy | Karissa Barry & Elissa Hanson

how long can we do this for? | Good Women Dance Collective

        October 27, 8:00 PM at DJD Dance Centre Studio Theatre

  Includes a Post-Show Artist Talk

Idiosyncratic group works by western Canadian movers and shakers.

Through sardonic interactions, blunt physicality, and a brutally humorous text, It began with watching explores the warping of democracy as governments, concentrated wealth, and surveillance technologies join forces. With ‘alternative facts’ and outlandish acts, the puppet master toys with his political minions who enact any whim or fancy he can conjure.

Entropy is commonly known as a measure of disorder, randomness of a system, or of our lack of information about it. Submission to Entropy is a work is inspired by the human response to change and follows the transformation of two beings that evolve from the discovery and recognition of disorder.

how long can we do this for? is a question about duration. How long can we keep doing something and when does it transform from being ok to not being ok? With sound designer Shawn Pinchbeck, Good Women Dance Collective considers insatiability in the context of society and the body. When is enough enough?


TO SUBMIT

Share your passion with us!

In one-page or less, introduce yourself, tell us why you’re interested in Fluid Festival, and why you’d like to take part in the program.

Send submissions to Katherine at fluidfest@springboardperformance.com before 6pm MST, September 25, 2017.

Successful applicants will be notified by October 2, 2017

 

Be curious. Be moved. Be FLUID.

Join the Springboard Team!

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We're hiring three summer student positions, a containR Art Park Production Assistant, Fluid Festival Production Assistant and Marketing Assistant.

Springboard Performance is a non-profit organization devoted to connecting artists, mediums, audiences and community through physical contemporary creation and public space manipulation. Our activities include: containR – a pop-up arts and community installation built from recycled shipping containers, currently installed in Sunnyside and soon to animate East Village Junction; the Fluid Movement Arts Festival – an annual contemporary performance and dance festival of regional, national and international artists; and Interrarium Creative Residency for professional artists at the Banff Centre for Arts and Creativity.

Springboard has a supportive, artistic and fluid working environment ideal for post-secondary students balancing multiple responsibilities and creative passions.

DEADLINE TO APPLY:  May 14, 6pm MST


CONTAINR ART PARK PRODUCTION ASSISTANT

Responsibilities:

  • Maintain containR events schedule
  • Act as the containR liaison and on-site representative at scheduled events
  • Involvement in City, partner, renter and artist communications
  • Coordinate, train and lead volunteers onsite
  • Liaise with containR technical team
  • Collaborate with Springboard marketing and communications team.
  • Connect with community about containR and seek out connections

Qualifications:

  • Enthusiastic, open-minded creative thinker with strong interpersonal skills. 
  • Excellent communication skills with ability to work independently and in collaboration with a group.
  • Strong organizational and time-management skills are essential.
  • Excellent writing and speaking skills.
  • Familiarity with Microsoft Office, Google and social media platforms.
  • The ability to work remotely as well as some evenings and weekends at containR Art Park in Sunnyside and containR at East Village Junction is essential.
  • Interest in the arts and linking cultural, sustainability, and community organizations is an asset.

FLUID FESTIVAL PRODUCTION ASSISTANT

Responsibilities:

  • Maintain master Fluid Festival event schedule.
  • Assist the marketing team with gathering and organizing information and images for marketing and publicity.
  • Coordinate artist itineraries, accommodations, schedules and contracts.
  • Training of event volunteers.
  • Collaborate with the office team.

Qualifications:

  • Enthusiastic, open-minded creative thinker with strong interpersonal skills. 
  • Excellent communication skills with ability to work independently and in collaboration with a group.
  • Strong organizational and time-management skills are essential.
  • Excellent writing and speaking skills.
  • Proficient in Microsoft Office and Google Platform.
  • Interest in the performing arts, production or pursuing a career related to the arts or non-profit sector is an asset.

SPRINGBOARD MARKETING ASSISTANT

Responsibilities:

  • Support public relations and the execution of the Springboard’s marketing strategy. 
  • Assist in administration and monitoring of social media platforms, writing and creating social media, blog and newsletter content.
  • Research and collection of information for media and hospitality documents.
  • Assist in communications with event partners, renters, audiences, city event liaisons, community members, and artists.

Qualifications:

  • Enthusiastic, open-minded creative thinker with strong interpersonal skills. 
  • Excellent communication skills, ability to work independently and in collaboration with a group.
  • Strong organizational and time-management skills are essential.
  • Excellent creative writing skills are required for this position.
  • Proficient in Microsoft Office and Google Platform
  • Working knowledge of online distribution and social media platforms (Mailchimp, Facebook, Twitter, Instagram).
  • Mobile Photography skills is an asset.
  • Graphic design skills and experience with Adobe Creative Suites (Photoshop, Illustrator and Indesign) is an asset.

All three positions are part of the Canada Summer Jobs Employment Program, with 25-35 hours per week. The negotiable start date is May 15th, 2017, with shifts available until the end of October. The successful candidate will have a flexible schedule as the position requires some evening and weekend hours. The candidate must be able to work remotely and at containR in Sunnyside and East Village Junction locations.

The total funding for the position is $4392. Applicants must be a returning full-time post-secondary student. Springboard is an equal opportunity employer and welcomes applications from all qualified parties.
 

To apply, please submit a resume and cover letter to pam@springboardperformance.com with subject ATTN: Summer Student Job before 6pm MST, May 14, 2017.