Join the Springboard Team!

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We're hiring three summer student positions, a containR Art Park Production Assistant, Fluid Festival Production Assistant and Marketing Assistant.

Springboard Performance is a non-profit organization devoted to connecting artists, mediums, audiences and community through physical contemporary creation and public space manipulation. Our activities include: containR – a pop-up arts and community installation built from recycled shipping containers, currently installed in Sunnyside and soon to animate East Village Junction; the Fluid Movement Arts Festival – an annual contemporary performance and dance festival of regional, national and international artists; and Interrarium Creative Residency for professional artists at the Banff Centre for Arts and Creativity.

Springboard has a supportive, artistic and fluid working environment ideal for post-secondary students balancing multiple responsibilities and creative passions.

DEADLINE TO APPLY:  May 14, 6pm MST


CONTAINR ART PARK PRODUCTION ASSISTANT

Responsibilities:

  • Maintain containR events schedule
  • Act as the containR liaison and on-site representative at scheduled events
  • Involvement in City, partner, renter and artist communications
  • Coordinate, train and lead volunteers onsite
  • Liaise with containR technical team
  • Collaborate with Springboard marketing and communications team.
  • Connect with community about containR and seek out connections

Qualifications:

  • Enthusiastic, open-minded creative thinker with strong interpersonal skills. 
  • Excellent communication skills with ability to work independently and in collaboration with a group.
  • Strong organizational and time-management skills are essential.
  • Excellent writing and speaking skills.
  • Familiarity with Microsoft Office, Google and social media platforms.
  • The ability to work remotely as well as some evenings and weekends at containR Art Park in Sunnyside and containR at East Village Junction is essential.
  • Interest in the arts and linking cultural, sustainability, and community organizations is an asset.

FLUID FESTIVAL PRODUCTION ASSISTANT

Responsibilities:

  • Maintain master Fluid Festival event schedule.
  • Assist the marketing team with gathering and organizing information and images for marketing and publicity.
  • Coordinate artist itineraries, accommodations, schedules and contracts.
  • Training of event volunteers.
  • Collaborate with the office team.

Qualifications:

  • Enthusiastic, open-minded creative thinker with strong interpersonal skills. 
  • Excellent communication skills with ability to work independently and in collaboration with a group.
  • Strong organizational and time-management skills are essential.
  • Excellent writing and speaking skills.
  • Proficient in Microsoft Office and Google Platform.
  • Interest in the performing arts, production or pursuing a career related to the arts or non-profit sector is an asset.

SPRINGBOARD MARKETING ASSISTANT

Responsibilities:

  • Support public relations and the execution of the Springboard’s marketing strategy. 
  • Assist in administration and monitoring of social media platforms, writing and creating social media, blog and newsletter content.
  • Research and collection of information for media and hospitality documents.
  • Assist in communications with event partners, renters, audiences, city event liaisons, community members, and artists.

Qualifications:

  • Enthusiastic, open-minded creative thinker with strong interpersonal skills. 
  • Excellent communication skills, ability to work independently and in collaboration with a group.
  • Strong organizational and time-management skills are essential.
  • Excellent creative writing skills are required for this position.
  • Proficient in Microsoft Office and Google Platform
  • Working knowledge of online distribution and social media platforms (Mailchimp, Facebook, Twitter, Instagram).
  • Mobile Photography skills is an asset.
  • Graphic design skills and experience with Adobe Creative Suites (Photoshop, Illustrator and Indesign) is an asset.

All three positions are part of the Canada Summer Jobs Employment Program, with 25-35 hours per week. The negotiable start date is May 15th, 2017, with shifts available until the end of October. The successful candidate will have a flexible schedule as the position requires some evening and weekend hours. The candidate must be able to work remotely and at containR in Sunnyside and East Village Junction locations.

The total funding for the position is $4392. Applicants must be a returning full-time post-secondary student. Springboard is an equal opportunity employer and welcomes applications from all qualified parties.
 

To apply, please submit a resume and cover letter to pam@springboardperformance.com with subject ATTN: Summer Student Job before 6pm MST, May 14, 2017.

The Distance That Separates Us | SCPA Review by Brittany Welgan

The Distance That Separates Us | SCPA Review by Brittany Welgan

The Distance That Separates Us is choreographed by Graham McKelvie of Calgary, and performed by him, Linnea Swann and contemporary and professional graduate students from the School of Alberta Ballet. They explore the concept that, although constantly connected to each other through social media, we can still feel alone. McKelvie and Swann talk about being weird and not fitting into the mold of the social norm, as well as about being manipulated to fit into it,, explaining their stories and contextualizing the piece through monologues at the beginning. As they are talking, dancers in the background perform simple pedestrian movements, which complement the dialogue without distracting from it. These monologues really set the tone for the whole performance as the dancers carry, manipulate and rely on each other for most of the piece, while exploring a large kinesphere. Movement is grounded and the speed is relatively fast and even, with a mixture of awkward pedestrian movements in the background and fast flowing intricate movements the focus in front. At times McKelvie walks across the stage, talking on his phone, completely oblivious to the people dancing around him, exemplifying how, nowadays, the mediated experience of phones is more usual and comforting than immediate interaction with physically present beings. As online presence grows, everyday face-to-face interaction becomes less important and less comfortable. This was my favorite piece of the night and the concept is one that really stuck with me. It’s saddening that in a world of unlimited connectivity and constant physical interaction, people feel so alone and isolated. 

 
Brittany Welgan is a dancer and dance teacher from Calgary, Alberta. She is currently pursuing her passion by studying dance at The University of Calgary.

Brittany Welgan is a dancer and dance teacher from Calgary, Alberta. She is currently pursuing her passion by studying dance at The University of Calgary.

 

Leftovers | SCPA Review by Zoe Abrigo

Leftovers | SCPA Review by Zoe Abrigo

Leftovers, performed by Company 605 Co-Artistic Director Josh Martin, explores the body’s creation of ideas and retrieval of memory. Martin’s quick and precise time signature facilitates a pixilated, somewhat stop-motion imagery like I’ve never seen before. As he advances across the stage, sequences are chopped into pieces, so that the spaces in between constantly interrupt his line of vision. His limbs struggle to lift his body from the ground, while his mind seems to disconnect from his tissue and bone. Martin explores how the mind and the body become two separate entities, each competing for the same resource: memory.

The mind has its own recollection of memory, as does the body. This internal conflict causes a lag in the movement’s ability to reach its potential. Then a sequence appears in which movement ideas are franticly interrupted by more ideas, which attests to an underlying emotion of anxiousness. Through repetition of movement, Martin explores how different body parts retrieve the same memory. A constant internal shift of perspective creates impulses that pull and shove his body. His muscle and bone compete for attention, while he himself is silent, as if he is a bystander of his own body, witnessing this all of his joints, limbs, and digits give a frantic speech.

An incredible investigation of the mind and body’s response to memory, Leftovers, left me in a coherent daze. 

 
Zoe Abrigo, from Honolulu, Hawaii, is a first-year student at the University of Calgary studying in the BFA dance program. She trains in ballet and contemporary, and has a strong interest in both performance and choreography. 

Zoe Abrigo, from Honolulu, Hawaii, is a first-year student at the University of Calgary studying in the BFA dance program. She trains in ballet and contemporary, and has a strong interest in both performance and choreography. 

 

Cabaret of Flamenco Experiments | SCPA Review by Nadia Riterman

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Cabaret of Flamenco Experiments | SCPA Review by Nadia Riterman

If Flamenco is synonymous with passion, then last night’s cabaret said ‘wait a minute, what if it wasn’t, and what else is there?’. As the act unfolds, to the surprise of the viewers and the performers themselves, many of the elements I expect to see in a Flamenco performance disintegrate and a whole world of new possibilities appears. As Calgary’s Rosanna Terracciano lays on the floor, arms and legs flailing, missing one shoe, abandoning the proud carriage of a Flamenco dancer, I begin to form an image of a rebel, breaking rules long held.

As Terracciano bursts into wild abandon and then collapses, Montreal’s Myriam Allard continues to maintain her beautiful carriage and satisfies the aesthetic eye. But the curiosity inherent in improvisation takes her further, as she takes off her teal shoe and proceeds into a one shoe Flamenco frenzy, her face serious and blank. I hardly manage to hold back my laughter.

Elements of humour begin to appear everywhere, and I notice that there is an inside joke shared between the dancers, singer and musicians that I am not privy to, but I don’t care. The intensity of their connection becomes a focal point of its own.  The exchange of smiles, penetrating looks, and occasional conversation, highlight the focus and presence of each artist as they try to tune into the flow of improvisation. Later, when I talk to the percussionist, Miguel Medina, he says that ‘you have to be present all the time’. He tells me that they know the language, body and rhythm; however, when improvising, the language becomes the backbone, and what happens in between the notes and rhythms is where the magic begins.

For the music lover, the cabaret is a source for enlightening conversations for days to come.

Caroline Plante’s Flamenco guitar is the highlight for my partner, a musician, who is again reminded how expressive and powerful flamenco music can be. Hedi Graja, an accomplished Flamenco cantor and part of La Otra Orilla with Myriam Allard, is my highlight, singing haunting melodies, interspersed with ‘La fromage’ cries. And finally, Chris Dadge, a multi-instrumentalist from Calgary, creates ambient sounds from a combination of funny looking tools that accompany his drum set. As I found out later, this is the first time Dadge has sat in with the group, and he does not actually know Flamenco music. But his ear, evidently, is well practiced, because not for a moment does he looks out of place, or tune.

And lastly, a surprise video from world renowned Contemporary Flamenco dancer Juan Carlos Lerida: It’s in Spanish, and apparently played backwards. No idea what he says. But in this one-hour cabaret these surprises are everywhere. And I am left a better woman for it. 

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Lab Rats | SCPA Review by Reese Wilson

Lab Rats | SCPA Review by Reese Wilson

Lab Rats, created by the accomplished and prolific artist Marie France Forcier is a transfixing performance depicting a study on the fragility of the human condition. The performers are the subjects, or lab rats, of this study, and the audience are the veiled observers of an experiment that had commenced long before their entrance to the space.

Subjected to the identity-stripping environment of a barren glass case, one can infer the increasing possessiveness of the objects within the case is an unconscious effort by the subjects to grasp at any form of individuality. The slow ascent to physical touch from mere eye contact throughout the work is another example of the human response to coerced isolation. We see the subjects evolve from individual seclusion to casting territorial glances each other’s way, to finally almost hostile physical manipulation of each other. This evolution of the subject’s response to one another is a reflection on the exploration of our afflictions as humans when put into direct speculation. One seemingly cannot form a connection with another when their individuality has been dismantled. Throughout the work, Forcier immerses the audience in the disintegration of sanity and will to fight the inevitable, perpetual solitude; so much so that the steady fracture of the subjects almost goes completely unnoticed until the final moments of the piece leave observers breathless and deep in thought, wondering how they would respond if subjected to similar circumstances. Can anyone truly be sure of their actions? This is one of the many questions Forcier masterfully explores without hope for a definitive answer. Lab Rats is a captivating picture of the world we live in but often fail, or purposefully forget to truly discover. What lies beneath the surface of our carefully crafted lives, and our true human condition?

 
Currently, Reese Wilson is exploring the many facets of dance as a first year student in the University of Calgary’s dance program. She is particularly interested in the choreographic art and how human experiences can be made into art. She plans to continue her exploration and the creation of art long after she graduates.

Currently, Reese Wilson is exploring the many facets of dance as a first year student in the University of Calgary’s dance program. She is particularly interested in the choreographic art and how human experiences can be made into art. She plans to continue her exploration and the creation of art long after she graduates.

 

            

Physical Therapy Cabaret 2016 | The Mark Hopkins take.

Physical Therapy Cabaret 2016 | The Mark Hopkins take.

“I am not a professional flamenco dancer,” says Judith Mendelsohn, pacing the stage in a fiery traje de flamenca. “So what the heck am I doing here?”

It’s a reasonable question. She’s part of the 2016 Fluid Festival, a contemporary performance and dance festival that isn’t short on highly-trained flamenco dancers. (It even includes a Cabaret of Flamenco Experiments coming up next week,October 27 & 28.) But this? This is the Physical Therapy Cabaret, and a clown dancing flamenco fits right in.

As a Calgary artist, I’m a little jealous of Edmonton’s Dirt Buffet Cabaret, “a monthly cabaret of unexpected works in progress” hosted by Mile Zero Dance. It’s a place for artistic experimentation and failure, where artists get to push their personal and aesthetic boundaries, and it’s okay to fall on your face (metaphorically or otherwise). The Physical Therapy Cabaret, a Fluid Fest mainstay since the first edition in 2006, shares that love for boundary-breaking experimentation. When it comes around, once a year, a group of local, provincial and national artists are set loose to try things they might not otherwise dare.

It’s easy for artists to get pigeonholed – writers are supposed to act a certain way, actors another. (“You know what happens when dancers talk,” says Lin Snelling during her piece. “Don’t you?”) I help run Swallow-a-Bicycle Theatre, and it can be easy to forget that I – Mark Hopkins, the individual – have a creative practice outside of my company. In past editions of Physical Therapy, various Swallow-a-Bicyclers have been given the chance to spread our wings. One year, I drank a beer on stage with a stranger while sharing old family vacation slides. Another year, my colleague Charles Netto made sweet love to a burger.

Tonight, Swallow-a-Bicycle’s long-time staff member Alicia Ward takes the stage wearing a tank top inexplicably emblazoned with the word TART. “I do not draw,” she says. “I do not tap dance,” says Amanda Ho. For the next ten minutes, the dancer and illustrator frenetically swap roles in a performative enactment of skill-building. Creative boundaries, broken.

The night’s ten distinct and varied performances are threaded together by host Allison Zwozdesky in the persona of “Cheer Applausealot”, Calgary’s best audience member. Her mission is to train us in the duties of a good audience, from supplies (tissues, poking sticks for pesky seatmates) to applause technique. “You, as an audience member, need to be ready for anything.”

She’s right. The pieces embody the range of human emotion from Chenise Mitchell’s choreography of boredom (in an utterly relatable doctor’s waiting room) to Richard Lee’s embodiment of fun (with a brief detour into the pronunciation of “zed” versus “zee”), Jeannie Vanderkerkhove’s choreography of relaxation (sunny beaches, full-body hugs) to Oriana Pagnotta’s dry-humping, loogie-hocking, ball-grabbing, air-guitaring, stage-stomping display of gendered aggression. Pam Tzeng’s collaboration with musician/sound designer Krzysztof Sujata took the darkest dive into the human condition, performing a piece that evoked bondage and constraint to a shrill soundscape punctuated with the voices of distressed children, Tzeng’s face disfigured with dark oily patterns and the tiny voiceless mouths of parasitic twins.

The night also takes a journey through dance history. Mendelsohn’s amateur flamenco enthusiast proves to be Ida Rubinstein, a Russian Jew of the Belle Époque who fearlessly donned the roles of ballet dancer, actor and wealthy patron. Linnea Swan provides a crash course in Yvonne Rainer’s 1965 “No Manifesto”, intended to revolutionize dance and reduce it to its essential elements. Lin Snelling gives us a more personal glimpse of the past, declaring “I was there in the 80s” as she spasmodically whips a chair around the stage, tuning her body to Michael Reinhart’s acoustic guitar that rolls from string to percussion instrument and back again.

The night closes with Vancouver’s Ralph Escamillan in a full body spandex suit, looking like a bedazzled member of the Blue Man Group in a shiny red suit. He strips off layer after layer to Elvis Presley’s “(You’re The) Devil in Disguise”, hammering home the point: this is Physical Therapy. Anything goes.

“Maybe I should just stop?” says Mendelsohn toward the end of her flamenco experiment, lamenting her lack of technique. She drops her poise, despondent, turns her back, walks away… but then, looks over her shoulder with an arched eyebrow. “Fuck it.” She launches into a fishnetted high-kick routine. And the crowd goes wild.

 
Mark Hopkins is a Calgary-based theatre artist and community-builder. He is the Co-Artistic Director of Swallow-a-Bicycle Theatre, Calgary‘s leading purveyor of fearless site-specific theatre. He’s also thrilled to be associated with the Calgary Foundation, Human Venture Leadership and VoteKit Calgary, and is the founder of We Should Know Each Other (www.wskeo.com). Some of Mark’s honours and awards include the Creative Placemaking Award (2016 Mayor's Lunch for Arts Champions), the Queen Elizabeth II Diamond Jubilee Medal, Avenue Magazine’s Top 40 Under 40 and the Calgary Herald’s 20 Compelling Calgarians. Photo: Neil Zeller Photography

Mark Hopkins is a Calgary-based theatre artist and community-builder. He is the Co-Artistic Director of Swallow-a-Bicycle Theatre, Calgary‘s leading purveyor of fearless site-specific theatre. He’s also thrilled to be associated with the Calgary Foundation, Human Venture Leadership and VoteKit Calgary, and is the founder of We Should Know Each Other (www.wskeo.com).

Some of Mark’s honours and awards include the Creative Placemaking Award (2016 Mayor's Lunch for Arts Champions), the Queen Elizabeth II Diamond Jubilee Medal, Avenue Magazine’s Top 40 Under 40 and the Calgary Herald’s 20 Compelling Calgarians.

Photo: Neil Zeller Photography

 

The Moon at Midnight | SCPA Review by Jillian Ung

The Moon at Midnight | SCPA Review by Jillian Ung

The Moon at Midnight, choreographed and created by Amber Borotsik, is a piece that manifests at the intersection between dance, theatre and sound.  This fifty-five-minute masterpiece, performed by nine multi-talented performers, takes you on an emotional rollercoaster, full of confusion, fear, excitement – in fact, pretty much the full range of adrenalin stimulants.  At the beginning, the performers are moving to a very popular Beyoncé song; almost immediately I sense that each individual performer has a vital character that will captivate me through the entire performance. As I watch this thrilling presentation, I find myself calm, until out of nowhere an explosion of sound, lights, colours and movements makes me jump right out of my seat. The lighting and sound design, created by Stephanie Bahniuk and Aaron Marci, intensifies the piece through amazing creativity, the lighting changes in colour and shape help imply and amplify the mood and the scene. The sound score and intense breaths add shocking dynamics, making my mood twist and turn. Not only is the performance well put together, but a sense of truth and clarity pervades various scenes. This compelling performance intrigued me, demanding my wrapt attention. I found myself constantly interested in what was happening, and curious about what was going to happen next. The piece resulted in a mix of emotions as well as a near continuous flux of brain power, as if I was trying to contain the knowledge the performance was presenting. In my opinion this performance is absolutely radiant. 

 
Jillian Ung is a first year BFA Dance major at the University of Calgary. Between school and the Calgary dance community, she studies Jazz, Contemporary, Modern, Ballet, Tap and Hip Hop.

Jillian Ung is a first year BFA Dance major at the University of Calgary. Between school and the Calgary dance community, she studies Jazz, Contemporary, Modern, Ballet, Tap and Hip Hop.

 

Major Motion Picture | SCPA Review by Emily Losier

Major Motion Picture | SCPA Review by Emily Losier

Major Motion Picture – a title that is both figurative and literal – treats us to a tangible discussion regarding territory, surveillance, and the distortion of universal truths that arises through the integration of technology. As the piece opens, we are introduced to a group of dancers, travelling in a vessel, who continuously depend on each other, and utilize weighted moments, momentum, and powerful extensions to draw us into their creation of time and space transcending shapes. Soon enough, more characters enter the piece, providing an ominous presence that overarches the entire piece and makes the original dancers cautious of every move they make, before creating a group that is fearless and unforgiving, revealing the truth through gruesome imagery that is uncomfortable; more so, perhaps, because it contains a grain of truth.

This piece immediately presents itself as a provocative political drama that demands the audience realize how large bodies of power can often control us and make us turn against those we are closest to. Dancers shift from being grounded and slow in their movements, from supporting one another to create beautiful shapes that represent trust and community, to producing snarling, animalistic and jagged movements that bound and flip to the accompaniment of heavy drums, ending with fingers being pointed in every direction, with a close eye kept on the person nearest you. We witness the power in surrendering, in changing and shifting ideas and perspectives as the dancers reach for and break apart from one another, struggling to understand their surroundings, their comrades – even themselves.  When the two communities meld together, we sense the contrast between them. We witness moments where dancers attempt to run away, only to be pulled back; we witness amazing instances where dancers throw each other around in movements that elicit gasps from the amazed audience. We relish the power silhouette images, the power of a large body of dancers, and lines that can make any shape become real and mobile. Listening to the breath that arises from the bodies on stage, and the genuine interactions that read clear in the spotlight, we are reminded of the innate humanity that is ingrained in this piece, and it makes these ideas resonate to our cores.

As these three entities interact on stage, we are introduced to a greater message that revolves around politics, societal understandings, and what we understand about human nature. I begin to ask myself questions revolving around these ideas: what affects do fear and hysteria have on a person or a group of people? How can we accept ourselves? How do we deal with loss, even if it is for the greater good? Who can we really trust: them, or even ourselves? Are we allowed to enjoy having power? This political piece showcases the strength of fearless dancers who transcend space and time with awe-inspiring feats of athleticism, with moments of intense humanity, and with moments that provokes us to look inside ourselves, to consider our morals and how we distinguish between good and evil, how we come to terms with who we really are, and the importance of identifying ourselves; it’s either “us” or “them”, and often times we are unable to tell the difference. 

 
Emily Losier is a studying for her BFA in Dance at the University of Calgary. Her passion for dance, her commitment to the Calgary arts community, and her determination to integrate dance into Calgary culture is demonstrated by her work with Arts Commons, Junior Achievement and the CBE.

Emily Losier is a studying for her BFA in Dance at the University of Calgary. Her passion for dance, her commitment to the Calgary arts community, and her determination to integrate dance into Calgary culture is demonstrated by her work with Arts Commons, Junior Achievement and the CBE.

 

It's going to get worse and worse and worse, my friend | SCPA Review by Nadia Riterman

It's going to get worse and worse and worse, my friend | SCPA Review by Nadia Riterman

Wearing a tight white collar shirt and gray pants, Lisbeth enters the stage, her hair pulled back, her lips fashioned in a curious smile. She marches towards the front, stops, her eyes taking in the view in front of her. Her powerful stance and athletic figure remind me of a tiger surveying his prey. Her first movement is of a steady hand, gliding horizontally in front her, creating a clear boundary, as if she is signaling us to quiet down: she is now in control. Her presence shrouded in an ominous sound, not yet clearly defined.  

The theme is stated clearly in the program; I am about to watch the power of a speech unfold in front me. And as the craftily demure opening gradually begins to grow in dimension, both in sound and movement, I begin to feel my body as captive; heart – pounding, breath – shallow, jaw clenching. Rage. Can it possibly be rage? I am safe in my seat, watching an exceptional dancer, yet my body prepares to pounce on an invincible and unknown enemy. In less than 30 minutes, through sharp, overarching movement and sound unexpectedly growing louder, Lisbeth creates a soldier that can attack on slightest provocation. 

Lisbeth and her sound partner clearly demonstrate how skillful manipulation of body language and exhilarating loud sound can trigger basic emotions, overriding the stronghold of a human intellect. But she doesn’t end the piece there, she takes it further and further to the edge, and there, something else is lurking. And as her body shakes, gradually the floor underneath me shakes, and then my body shakes. When she collapses, she appears empty, as though she has given it all – All of herself. The emptiness is mine as well. And yet within it there is something more, something much bigger, bigger than I can imagine.

 

 
First year dance major at U of C. My path took me on a long winding road, through 3 continents, a psychology degree, yoga teachers certification, until it finally brought me back home; home that is dance.

First year dance major at U of C. My path took me on a long winding road, through 3 continents, a psychology degree, yoga teachers certification, until it finally brought me back home; home that is dance.

 

Dollhouse | UofC SCPA Student Review, Tessa Leier

Dollhouse | UofC SCPA Student Review, Tessa Leier

Fluid Festival 2016 presents the thrilling and shattering performance of Dollhouse, featuring Bill Coleman, a master performer and tap legend, and Gordon Monahan, a well-known and innovative composer. The unique performance is brought to life through the use of such atypical sound devices as broken shards of glass, mouse traps, a ladder, velcro tiles, metal bowls full of boiling hot water, and plates attached to metal wires, which are used to create sounds unique to the battle Coleman faces throughout his journey. As the journey progresses, Coleman appears to be in agonizing pain, if the crackles, pops, and snaps he encounters while being shattered to the floor within his suit of glass, rolling over at least fifty mouse traps, and losing his clothes along the way are any indication. His ghostly visage, across which flits expressions varying from pain, to surprise, and what might well be a look of transcendence, haunts the audience; yet creates a sense of wonder in the viewer as they ask themselves why this poor man is so often in this much pain. Occasionally, Coleman’s use of chaotic movement produces welcome comic relief in the form of laugh out loud moments, in which everyone joins. Using unsettling sound, arising from unique and inspiring production methods, Coleman shares his journey through the Dollhouse. The question remains: will he make it out of the Dollhouse alive?

Tessa Leier is currently in the BA Dance Program at the University of Calgary. She has been dancing for the past fifteen years and is excited to be pursuing her passion.

Tessa Leier is currently in the BA Dance Program at the University of Calgary. She has been dancing for the past fifteen years and is excited to be pursuing her passion.