Triple Bill Review by Mark Kunji Ikeda

Triple Bill Review by Mark Kunji Ikeda

Choreographer Kate Stashko, the Good Women Dance Collective, and sound designer Shawn Pinchbeck explored duration in How long can we do this for. The question of discomfort was initially proposed alongside demands of “What is your first pleasure?” As Alida Nyqvist-Schultz was placed into more and more awkward physical positions she maintains her answers of simple pleasures in life; her rigid struggles assured us that she wasn’t in any position to laugh until she cries. This structure of initial proposal followed to excess became the organizing principle of the work. Two women frantically, almost carelessly adorning the third with articles of clothing as the soundscape proposed childlike laughter and the youthful exuberance of excess. As sounds shifted into variants of “more” and “enough” the dynamic repetition of tasks and the assurance that “I could do this forever” brought an interesting balance between intrigue and concern.

Karissa Barry’s Submission to Entropy succeeded in its promise to submit to a gradual decline into disorder. The opening proposition introduced two otherworldly, bird-like creatures who brought us into their own surreal world by discovering and exploring their new surroundings. Their eventual meeting was an energetic high-point that held great fascination and potential as they began to understand the ‘other.’ These two creatures somehow transformed offstage and were replaced by two contemporary dancers. Strong angular movement and disorder reigned: we are left to decide for ourselves how, or if, the existence of the two original characters impacted the dancers. Pulsing lights slowly warmed the space, shifting from otherworldly blue to an understood warm as the contemporary movement phrases shifted away from a curious pairing into two separate dancers who engage in calculated strong physical work.

Kloetzel&co’s It began with watching uses form and content to drive home their unapologetic response to right-wing politicians. What begins as stoic movement score of power poses and political gestures is soon interrupted by what becomes an absurdist confessional monologue of how easy it is to manipulate politicians. Our ‘leader’ is in full command of their score of underlings as we are treated to the full gamut of their power; conducting the hoard in everything from their speech patterns, to shifting their laws of physics. The suggestible mass, clad in business attire and boxer shorts, were run through their paces by their manipulative overlord while - in true villain fashion - explaining their twisted methodology to us. This display was made through multiple routes, getting more and more absurd to the point of including a live saxophonist to underscore the vaudeville nature of this grotesque routine. It seemed to be going beyond the decorum of the length of a triple bill dance piece: we understood the message, now it’s time to end the piece; but that was the point, these political messages continue to be repeated, to thrive. It began with watching proves that dance belongs in political conversations.

Mark Kunji Ikeda creates original performances that combine narrative and dance. His training in dance and theatre has developed a unique methodology combining story, imagination, and choreography that has lead to being named the 2015 Emerging Artist by Calgary Arts Development Authority. He has trained extensively with Denise Clarke of One Yellow Rabbit and Gerry Trentham of lbs/sq”, his fearless political works have included the Japanese Canadian internment (Sansei: The Storyteller) and toxic masculinity (The Golden Penis). Mark is the Artistic Director of Cloudsway Dance Theatre, an ensemble member of the Dancers’ Studio West, has taught at the University of Calgary, Mount Royal University, and the Rosebud School of the Arts, and served as Artistic Director of MoMo Dance Theatre. His work has been performed across Canada and his one-man show Sansei: The Storyteller continues to tour nationally.

Mark Kunji Ikeda creates original performances that combine narrative and dance. His training in dance and theatre has developed a unique methodology combining story, imagination, and choreography that has lead to being named the 2015 Emerging Artist by Calgary Arts Development Authority. He has trained extensively with Denise Clarke of One Yellow Rabbit and Gerry Trentham of lbs/sq”, his fearless political works have included the Japanese Canadian internment (Sansei: The Storyteller) and toxic masculinity (The Golden Penis).

Mark is the Artistic Director of Cloudsway Dance Theatre, an ensemble member of the Dancers’ Studio West, has taught at the University of Calgary, Mount Royal University, and the Rosebud School of the Arts, and served as Artistic Director of MoMo Dance Theatre. His work has been performed across Canada and his one-man show Sansei: The Storyteller continues to tour nationally.

Dancing Difference // Moving Forward Review by Mark Kunji Ikeda

Dancing Difference // Moving Forward Review by Mark Kunji Ikeda

Dancing Difference // Moving Forward

Review by Mark Kunji Ikeda

The Fluid Festival and Inside Out Theatre combined to bring Calgary a treat of the possibilities of mixed-ability performance. The program title “Dancing Difference” had been forsaken at the request of the performers for the much more inclusive title “Moving Forward.” This is an important distinction as the original title highlighted how we are different as opposed to celebrating the movement potential that we share. As the evening moved forward, it was clear that there was much to celebrate in the national mixed-ability performance community.

The first piece, See and Be Seen was created by former Calgarian Naomi Brand through the Vancouver company All Bodies Dance Project. The piece explored the possibilities of two bodies and a mobility tool. It exemplified how bodies can move, and how a wheelchair can assist and extend choreographic possibilities to encompass the unique fluidity and potentially dangerous images that could be achieved by Adam Warren and Carolina Bergonzoni. Warren moved with powerful complexity that can’t help but remind me of a young version of the late Thomas Poulsen - who is remembered as a mainstay in Calgary’s performance and disability communities.

What’s Left of Us features the grand theatricality described as “two 2 spirited ndns with only two hands between them.” The grand entrance bring a delightful juxtaposition when then two performers triumphantly extend their left hands and pause to bring full attention to their partially formed left hands. Justin Manyfingers and Brian Soloman’s disarming exploration of their youth is supported by quirky recording from both performers, and a truly beautiful interview with Soloman’s mother. While the piece occasionally felt like two solos, the parallels of their journeys were woven together through compelling physicality, highlighted by tangible emotional honesty.

Heidi Janz’s film We Regret to Inform You was a riveting example of how our healthcare system is set up at the disadvantage of persons with disabilities. The film takes us through daily tasks in the life of the PhD playwright who has cerebral palsy. The film highlights the admirable patience that the affable Janz brings to certain tasks which require her full attention - such as typing, or operating the elevator. Meanwhile, a chipper female voice informs us that Ms Janz has been denied disability insurance income due to her being too “productive” and earning her PhD. The event was highlighted when Janz’s Calgary Access bus arrived early and threatened to leave without her, requiring a hasty exit rather than enjoying the accolades she deserved.

Finally, All Bodies Dance Project returned with Verbatim, a look into the curious world of those who live near us, and how our assumptions shape how we interact with others. Supported by a simple grey folding table and voice recordings, Warren and Bergonzoni create a full apartment block of unknown faces who all ask “what are they doing in there?” The assortment of unknown characters were humorous and relatable in how we view others, before underlining the inherent similarities that these neighbours - and each of us - share.  

Mark Kunji Ikeda creates original performances that combine narrative and dance. His training in dance and theatre has developed a unique methodology combining story, imagination, and choreography that has lead to being named the 2015 Emerging Artist by Calgary Arts Development Authority. He has trained extensively with Denise Clarke of One Yellow Rabbit and Gerry Trentham of lbs/sq”, his fearless political works have included the Japanese Canadian internment (Sansei: The Storyteller) and toxic masculinity (The Golden Penis). Mark is the Artistic Director of Cloudsway Dance Theatre, an ensemble member of the Dancers’ Studio West, has taught at the University of Calgary, Mount Royal University, and the Rosebud School of the Arts, and served as Artistic Director of MoMo Dance Theatre. His work has been performed across Canada and his one-man show Sansei: The Storyteller continues to tour nationally.  

Mark Kunji Ikeda creates original performances that combine narrative and dance. His training in dance and theatre has developed a unique methodology combining story, imagination, and choreography that has lead to being named the 2015 Emerging Artist by Calgary Arts Development Authority. He has trained extensively with Denise Clarke of One Yellow Rabbit and Gerry Trentham of lbs/sq”, his fearless political works have included the Japanese Canadian internment (Sansei: The Storyteller) and toxic masculinity (The Golden Penis).

Mark is the Artistic Director of Cloudsway Dance Theatre, an ensemble member of the Dancers’ Studio West, has taught at the University of Calgary, Mount Royal University, and the Rosebud School of the Arts, and served as Artistic Director of MoMo Dance Theatre. His work has been performed across Canada and his one-man show Sansei: The Storyteller continues to tour nationally.

 

Physical Therapy Cabaret Review by Cobra Collins

Physical Therapy Cabaret Review by Cobra Collins

I wasn't sure what to expect from the 12th annual Physical Therapy Cabaret, in fact upon being invited to watch and review the evening, I realized that I wasn’t even particularly clear on what a Cabaret was.

“Cabaret (English: /kæbəˈreɪ/) is a form of entertainment featuring music, song, dance, recitation, or drama. It is mainly distinguished by the performance venue, which might be a pub, a restaurant or a nightclub with a stage for performances.”

With a diverse lineup of performers, all of whom seemed set on pushing boundaries, the evening itself, would not be so easy to define. Throughout the hour an half long event the audience was invited to take a personal journey into each performer's world. Whether it was through dance, performance, monologue or music, each artist managed to immerse us in their own unique story or experience. For myself as a spoken word artist, it was amazing to see how clearly and emotionally these moments could be translated through movement alone.

Jason Galeos beautiful opening piece invoked the feeling one gets when they toss a coin into a fountain; a moment of hope, followed by the realization that you’ve given away something tangible for a wish that, more than likely, won’t be granted. Kaja Irwin's physical transformation into an elderly woman for “Vroom” was striking, but it was her movements and way of portraying the lose of voice and autonomy that really captured my attention, a theme I also felt was prevalent in Su-Lin Tseng’s “Ruined Pages”. Both works painted haunting portrayals of womanhood, creating a frantic energy  that resonated throughout the space well after their respective performances ended. Also leaving behind something on stage, but perhaps more literally, was Terrance Houle with his short excerpt from “GHOSTDAYS”, Houle used his body and a theremin to conjure an audience of spirits to accompany the live audience already present in DJD Community Living Room.

Haunting and transformative, could very well have been the themes of this years Physical Therapy Cabaret. Karissa Barry used the multiple levels of the stunning DJD space beautifully with her piece “Shed” and Brian Solomon literally shed his clothing and in a way, sense of humanity, in his engaging performance “Thunderbird’s Transformation”. All of the artists laid themselves bare in one way or another, but it was Makambe K Simamba's profound vulnerability in “The Apartment” that, in my opinion, stole the show. My notes on the piece are short, one from the beginning stating “Pure Joy” and one from the end “Total Heartbreak”. Simamba's performance painted the reality of a woman’s, more specifically, a woman of colour’s daily existence in a way that had me wanting to pick her up from the ground and take her back home, where she would be safe. Except I didn't, nobody did.

The night ended on a lighter note with Allison Zwozdesky’s immersive performance on travel. A great display of movement and character building, I felt like the whole audience got to take a little vacation.

Across the board Fluid Festival's Physical Therapy Cabaret, was just that, therapeutic. With hosts that kept us laughing and artists that kept us guessing, it was an evening not to be missed.

Cobra Collins is a Calgary based Metis poet of significant height. She was the captain and coach of Calgary’s 2016 Slam team, representing our city on a national level at the Canadian Festival of Spoken Word and is a member of Calgary’s Inkspot Spoken Word Collective, home of Calgary's official poetry Slam. Cobra has participated in several Nationwide Spoken Word festivals, as well as collaborated with artists of different backgrounds for dance (Fluid Movements Arts Festival) and performance festivals (IKG 1 ! Live Performance Festival). Cobra was also honoured to be shortlisted as a nominee for Calgary's 2017 poet laureate.

Cobra Collins is a Calgary based Metis poet of significant height. She was the captain and coach of Calgary’s 2016 Slam team, representing our city on a national level at the Canadian Festival of Spoken Word and is a member of Calgary’s Inkspot Spoken Word Collective, home of Calgary's official poetry Slam. Cobra has participated in several Nationwide Spoken Word festivals, as well as collaborated with artists of different backgrounds for dance (Fluid Movements Arts Festival) and performance festivals (IKG 1 ! Live Performance Festival). Cobra was also honoured to be shortlisted as a nominee for Calgary's 2017 poet laureate.

Dancing Difference | SCPA Review

Dancing Difference | SCPA Review

Dancing Difference immediately enticed the audience. The close range of the stage, dancers and audience created an intimacy unlike any other. Offered in collaboration with Inside Outside Theatre, a company that works with artists with disabilities, this incredible piece was mesmerizing and captured the hearts of those who attended. 

With three live performances and a short documentary in the middle, the work of this piece was amazingly well done. The first dancers entered through the audience onto the stage, one performer in a wheel chair and the other standing beside him. It was brilliant to watch as the man got out of his chair and they both began dancing on the floor captivating the attention of everyone. Creating beautiful pictures with lifts, done by both performers, they showed undeniable strength as they lifted one another throughout the duet. The partners’ wonderful connection and ability to carry one another was incredible to watch, leaving a smile on everyone’s face.

Next, came the second duo, creating a much different vibe as they entered on a bicycle in a very slapstick manner. Using their vocals and symmetry of movement, they left everyone wanting more. The use of simple props was absolutely amazing. From a bottle of Coke to a sneaker, I was left impressed with the power these two brought to the stage.

Moving forward, we were presented with the short documentary on one incredible woman, who is wheelchair bound but who has a brilliance that is not. Following a day in her life, we were shown the struggles and the incredible way her perseverance and determination has carried her so far.

To wrap up this beautiful gift of a performance, the original two artists came back to the stage to finish off the piece. The overall energy of the audience was beaming with excitement  and curiosity to see what else they could offer. Using only a table and very limited space in their dance, the focus was on the connection of the dancers and the audio they played throughout their second duet. Having moments of stillness and hesitation as well as small movements and unique use of space, the final performance kept the bar high and finished off the Dancing Difference, or as it was re-named Forward Movement, with a bang.

Dance and movement truly has no limits. This performance was an exciting example of that, capturing the hearts of all who attended.

SadieBeth Rieb is a first year BA Dance Major at the University of Calgary. With 18 years of dancing under her belt, and dancing running in the family she is excited to progress in the field of performing arts at the University.

SadieBeth Rieb is a first year BA Dance Major at the University of Calgary. With 18 years of dancing under her belt, and dancing running in the family she is excited to progress in the field of performing arts at the University.

Triple Bill | SCPA Review

Triple Bill | SCPA Review

How long can we do this for? sparked my curiosity from the start as the trio opened the piece with an intense gaze towards each other. I was quite interested in the dialogue as it stated with the simplistic pleasures of an individual. The movement that ensued after the dialogue questioned just how pleasurable something could be until it pushed the boundaries of normalcy. I found that there was never a dull moment as there was consistent contrast between a multitude of dynamics, such as music and movement qualities, that kept me immersed throughout the piece.

The articulation of movements in Submission to Entropy was undeniably intriguing. I was truly captivated throughout this performance and revelled in the dancers’ connections to their bodies and to the music. The intricate undulation of the spine appeared to be so seemingly effortless and almost creature-like, while the head-tail connection and control in both dancers was notable. I was eager to explore every second of this piece, just as the dancers explored the space. Overall, it was a very well-done piece.

It Began with Watching, choreographed by Melanie Kloetzel, was incredibly dynamic and kept me on the edge of my seat from beginning to end. This work addressed how easily a political system can become corrupt and instill fear in a society. The piece maintained a theme of child’s play that was emphasized by a puppeteer who conducted the dynamic of the group with tone, speed, and volume. Although a bit dark in its theme, this performance also had a comical aspect that kept the audience engaged. I particularly enjoyed this piece because of the different turns it took between serious and humorous moods, and how well these shifts were approached on what some might consider to be a triggering topic.

Alyssa Maturino is a first-year BA dance major at the University of Calgary, she has been dancing for seven years and is currently training in urban, jazz, contemporary and ballet. Alyssa is actively involved in the dance community and dances with illFX Education.

Alyssa Maturino is a first-year BA dance major at the University of Calgary, she has been dancing for seven years and is currently training in urban, jazz, contemporary and ballet. Alyssa is actively involved in the dance community and dances with illFX Education.

This Duet That We've Already Done (so many times) | SCPA Review

This Duet That We've Already Done (so many times) | SCPA Review

Frédérick Gravel's This Duet That We've Already Done (so many times) fascinated the whole audience from the start. The duet showed all the intricacies of a convoluted relationship, including the appeal and rejection of each other, and the complex emotional situations a couple have to face. The use of really strong sounds including rock music, and the management of the lightning were key elements in engaging the audience in the moment, and helped us stay connected with the dancers.

The performance started with the two performers getting to know each other and demonstrating how they got into a relationship. The use of their body as part of the choreography became the main focus of the piece at this point. As an audience member, you could really understand what they were trying to express through their movement. The whole piece kept going through the stages of what human beings need to face during a relationship, and how it can become something really toxic and painful, yet necessary. When Fréderick started singing “Run for me darling, run for my life,” I realized that in a relationship even though others tell you that the relationship is hurting you, love is so blind that it does not allow you to realize the damage it can do to you.

The moment that stood out for me the most during the presentation was when the two dancers were standing next to each other, facing the audience exuding peace and calm through their whole bodies. The passion of Brianna and the ungracefulness of Fréderick brought the piece a distinct sensitivity. It gave the piece a sensation of playfulness and mystery.

Mariana Cornejo is from Querétaro, Mexico. She has been living in Calgary for two months, and is a first year student in the BA Dance program at the University of Calgary. Mariana started dancing when she was three years old, pursuing Ballet, Jazz and Musical Theatre. Her biggest interest is Musical Theatre and choreography.  She has taught ballet and jazz for five years in Mexico. 

Mariana Cornejo is from Querétaro, Mexico. She has been living in Calgary for two months, and is a first year student in the BA Dance program at the University of Calgary. Mariana started dancing when she was three years old, pursuing Ballet, Jazz and Musical Theatre. Her biggest interest is Musical Theatre and choreography.  She has taught ballet and jazz for five years in Mexico. 

This Duet That We've Already Done (so many times) Review by JD Tucker

This Duet That We've Already Done (so many times) Review by JD Tucker

This Duet That We’ve Already Done (so many times) is a piece for lovers. Not just people who are in love, but anyone who has felt the rawness of a connection, past or present. Choreographer Frédérick Gravel and his dance partner Brianna Lombardo paint a touching and turbulent picture of a relationship over the course of this 75-minute piece.

Beginning apart, the two dance around each other, Lombard alternatively frenetic and languid, Gravel starting out hesitant and halting. Like many a beginning, it is slow and a bit awkward at first. These first steps are accompanied by the curling twang of a guitar, precise and even, as the two take turns with their movements. Eventually, both the music and the dancing becomes more expressive and fluid, coming together and stopping. The twang is replaced by the thumping pulse of the score, then superseded by the rumbling and roiling bass; our two dancers join together in a movement that is tender and intense.

To anyone watching, the raw physicality on display is symbiotic chaos- meaningful and explosive. It all winds down as trysts do, to a lull, as our dancers disengage. Sweaty and heaving, they look as though they’ve been through a fight.

Surprisingly, the penultimate occurrence in the piece is Gravel himself, plaintively addressing his partner via song. Moving away, then standing apart from Lombard, he implores her to “run from me, darling.”  The music fades out, replaced by Joy Division’s “Love Will Tear Us Apart” as the dancers take their bows.

As an ode to the contemporary couple, this piece contains in itself all the complexities of a modern relationship. Messy, deliberate, sweet, raw, sensual, hurtful. This Duet runs through the life of a relationship that speaks to one that we’ve all experienced in one form or another.

From the touching and timid beginning, through the rocky middle with all of its fervor, heat, and passion, straight to the melancholy end. That our two dancers end the piece where they started, standing apart from each other, is telling. The choice of music in conjunction with the title suggests that This Duet is one that will be performed again and again, lovers circling around each other and coming together, only to fall apart over and over. Love will tear us apart, again, and This Duet That We’ve Already Done (so many times) will play out many times over.

There’s no mistaking the emotions that Gravel and Lombard have put into crafting this touching, raw and enjoyable piece.

JD Tucker is a SAIT journalism student and writer based in Calgary. Her expertise lies in food, but she relishes opportunities for expansion. 

JD Tucker is a SAIT journalism student and writer based in Calgary. Her expertise lies in food, but she relishes opportunities for expansion. 

 

 

 

 

Double Bill Review by Audrey Lane Cockett

Double Bill Review by Audrey Lane Cockett

Sara does a Solo and YES

Sara Porter and Linnea Swan’s respective one-woman shows brought a curious and sincerely funny night to Fluid Fest.

Sara’s unconventional blend of modern dance, clowning, improvisation, and monologues (not to mention ukulele, singing, tap, video, and prop work…!!!) gave life to the story of hilarious self-examination. Her unashamed honesty underpinned every movement and monologue as she playfully engaged with change and the limitations of the world. She skillfully drew together disciplines and delivered the solo with a heartfelt and inquisitive quality that won over the audience and endeared us to this strange and personal comedy.

YES instantly had everyone laughing with Linnea’s savagely honest, relatable, and hilarious video diary. The satirical one-woman show unpacked Yvonne Rainer’s No Manifesto with skilled movement, video, monologue, charisma, and wit. The show definitely had some inside jokes for the dance community, but the theme of confronting ‘No’ and the unfailingly human struggle for joy was captivating and teary eyed hilarious. Ultimately, she brought everyone in, poked fun at the seriousness of some modern dance, and moved us through the meeting of ridiculousness and simplicity. Each piece of comedy and tragic truth resonated in the whole room. Linnea’s beautifully executed performance and cutting humour will have you saying and feeling YES! If you can, go see it!
 

Audrey Lane is a poet, spoken word artist, arts organizer, and park naturalist based in Calgary, AB. Her work is rooted in her passion for wild, outside and in. Themes of mental health, gender equality, the dualities of love, and the natural world often percolate into her poems. She has competed and performed nationally and internationally, completed residencies in the Yukon and at Banff Centre for the Arts, is co-captain of Calgary’s 2017 Slam Team, and loves creating and performing in ways that stretch the edges of art. She is invested in exploring poetry and its intersections with other disciplines, soundscapes, learning, healing, and transformation. Website: www.audreylane.xyz             Instagram: @audreylane.c

Audrey Lane is a poet, spoken word artist, arts organizer, and park naturalist based in Calgary, AB. Her work is rooted in her passion for wild, outside and in. Themes of mental health, gender equality, the dualities of love, and the natural world often percolate into her poems. She has competed and performed nationally and internationally, completed residencies in the Yukon and at Banff Centre for the Arts, is co-captain of Calgary’s 2017 Slam Team, and loves creating and performing in ways that stretch the edges of art. She is invested in exploring poetry and its intersections with other disciplines, soundscapes, learning, healing, and transformation.

Website: www.audreylane.xyz             Instagram: @audreylane.c

Telemetry | SCPA Review

Telemetry | SCPA Review

Shay Kuebler and Radical System Art, with the help of the extremely talented Danny Nielsen, put on an engaging and electric show from start to finish. Telemetry used the intense percussion of Danny’s tap to contrast and enhance the already impressive movement from the dancers. Utilizing a combination of bebop, swing, and contemporary dance to great effect, the dancers of Telemetry showcased their utmost control over the dance to create an extremely dynamic performance.

The show begins in the dark. As Danny begins to tap lights begin to flicker in response to his sounds. Dancers weave in and out of the lights; they are never truly visible for more than a few seconds at a time. The group rolls and dives through an incredibly impressive display of explosive movement before abruptly hitting stops and pauses. By mimicking and contrasting the movements of Danny Nielson, the rest of the company creates a sense of communication. A connection is formed between the dancers on stage, and the audience. As the show progresses, the energy builds and the movements get faster and more frantic. Additionally, the lighting continues to draw focus towards the dancers in an incredible way. By using motion tracking, Telemetry is able to highlight the movements and connections of the dancers.  

Telemetry is the process of recording and transmitting data. In the show Telemetry, the dancers use their movements and bodies to translate intangible thoughts and ideas into something physical. Their movements, stimulated by the rhythm and light, make a performance that leaves the audience enthralled. At the end of the show the cast stands in the dark with only the sounds of their ragged breathing filling the space, bringing the piece to a natural organic close.


Evan Cooksley is a third-year Dance Major at the University of Calgary. He has extensive training in many forms of dance, including Tap, Jazz, and Contemporary. Evan has been a member of the Tritone Rhythm Ensemble, the Young Canadians of the Calgary Stampede, and is a current member of the Show Company.

Thus Spoke | SCPA Review

Thus Spoke | SCPA Review

Thus Spoke captivated the audience with its imprudent, exciting and humorous content. The first scene was remarkable, starting off with a male performer speaking through a mic that was the only prop used in the piece. The first political statement of the piece pertained to “privilege”. The dancer explored what it means to be privileged. Following that statement, the performer introduced the theme of “contingency” as he lay on the floor maneuvering himself around the mic stand. The performance switched suddenly as one of the male performers started a chant about salary. Loud rock and roll music began playing and the performers began running and yelling around the stage. In this moment the audience was pleasantly surprised and instantly became more engaged in the performance.

This piece makes you question, What is dance? What can the “body/ies” do? Simply put, dance is the movement quality of everyday actions in a different form. The dancers used the mic to clearly demonstrate their impulses and the music around them. They traveled through a great amount of space, utilizing the entire stage, exploring different abstract shapes and levels with their bodies. It was clear that the dancers focused on their breathing, as their bound movements were sustained and well executed. Having speech as the main element of the performance made for a very pleasurable experience. The infusion of speech and movement working together was mesmerizing. As the piece came to an end a female performer spoke about justice and how each and everyone one of us have the power to create a just world.

Are you dance curious? Satisfy your curiosity with this outrageous performance!    

Christina Scott-Casey is a dance major at The University Of Calgary. She has fifteen years of dance performing experience.

Christina Scott-Casey is a dance major at The University Of Calgary. She has fifteen years of dance performing experience.